Lincoln Park Historical Society

Lincoln Park History Museum

The Red Tour

Sunday, May 5, 2024
12pm to 5pm

Lincoln Park Historical Society

Lincoln Park History Museum

For information on events, click on the website below:

http://www.lincolnparkhistory.org/

Lincoln Park History Museum, located at the original 1922 Library building. Lincoln Park, or as once known, Beavertown, is small in geographic nature but has a rich and diverse history. The museum’s goal is to rediscover the town’s past and celebrate / preserve the history, which sadly, at times, is lost and forgotten.

Join us and discover our past which includes: dinosaurs, native American artifacts, revolutionary roads /houses, civil war hometown hero, part of the Morris Canal path, part of the Boonton Line Railroad branch, airport, major flood events, some Hollywood film locations and of course our townsfolks who sacrificed in war, volunteers (fire department, police, first aid, pal, scouting etc.), all who made Lincoln Park a wonderful town to grow up in and formed pride and sense of community. Learn how the town transformed from a small crossroad in the American revolution to a canal stopping point with incline plane, lock and hotel. Learn how it progressed from farming to resort area to commuting town. Explore, learn and help us rediscover our history!

The day the Railroad came to town and it changed everything! On December 14, 1870 the first passenger train stopped at Beavertown. School was closed that day so the students could witness this momentous occasion. The following year Beavertown’s name was changed to Lincoln Park. This event, started a large and long transformation of the town. Prior to this, the town was all farmland and the few businesses in town centered on support of the Morris Canal. Once the railroad came, the transformation started. Small industries were created which used the train system for shipping freight and the population started to grow. In the earlier 1900s advertisements were placed in New York /Brookyn newspapers advocating the benefits of country living. City folks would come by train for the summer and enjoy river activities and many of these folks became permanent residents. During this time the Morris canal was slowly fading away, not able to compete against the railroad. Soon, it was feasible to commute daily from Lincoln Park to New York by train and the population continued to grow along with more business to support the population. Yes, the day the railroad stopped in Lincoln Park transformed the town and made the foundation that it is today. Truly a momentous occasion.

This year's Pathways tour features topics of discussion established annually by the New Jersey Historical Commission (NJHC).